Archive for the ‘Wash and polish mitts’ Category

Kent Microfibre Noodle Cleans Up in Auto Express Car Wash Mitt Test

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Kent 2in1 Microfibre Noodle Wash Mitt Auto Express Best Buy 2012

The top spot in the first of 2012 Auto Express detailing product tests has been scooped by The Kent Microfibre 2in1 Microfibre Noodle Wash Mitt Q2429. In a test of 12 different brandsĀ and styles of wash mitt the Kent Wash Mitt came out top overall for its absorbency, grime removing abilities and fit.

The test which involved dividing the bodywork of a filthy car into sections. Then using the mitts both dry and then wet to see how they coped with removing caked-on dirt, the tightness of the fit, and overall control around more difficult areas of the car such as grills and wheels. Any extra features such as bug mesh and finger dividers etc also scored additional points. (more…)


Right tools ‘crucial to a clean car’

Monday, September 5th, 2011

If a job is worth doing it is worth doing properly and washing a car is a task that people should not look to cut corners on.

That means following best practice to avoid causing more damage and utilising all the correct tools.

For example, car shampoo is essential and owners should not even consider washing up liquid.

The same is true of the tools used to wipe the bodywork when wet and then soak it up so no water spots are left.

According to Automobilemag.com, wash mitts are the way forward and not paper towels or similar abrasive products.

"Microfibre or sheepskin mitts are ideal for washing, while a good quality chamois or microfibre towel is key for drying the car," the source noted.

Lauren Fix, the Car Coach at Your News Now, recently recommended drivers stick to the four W's when cleaning their vehicle.

These are washing, wiping, windows and wheels.

Posted by Mark Henderson
 


Hosing down ‘the first step in car exterior cleaning’

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Before breaking out the wash mitts and car shampoo, there is one other job that needs to be done to ensure the finish is as good as can be.

The very first step in any exterior detailing job is to use the hose pipe and hose the car down from top to bottom.

Fine particles will be deposited on the bodywork of the vehicle and if the owner does not rinse them off before washing, they risk wiping them against the paint and causing minute scratches.

And when motorists come to apply car waxes, they will notice the shine is not what they had hoped for, according to James Baggot, from Autoblog UK.

"These scratches will make your paint look dull and hazy in time, putting off buyers when you try to sell," he added.

Investing in a pressure washer could prove a wise move, with What Car? recently praising the Karcher K3.550 for its level of performance.

Posted by Matt Casson
 


Drivers ‘need separate wash mitts for the wheels’

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

When cleaning their cars, it is important that drivers use separate wash mitts for the wheels and bodywork.

Phil Mulkins, writing for Tulsa World, said that using different wash mitts for both areas will ensure that contaminants are not transferred from one surface to another.

"Wheels and tyres should be cleaned with a mitt other than the one used to wash the body to avoid contaminating the vehicle's paint with grit from the tyres," he stated.

Mr Mulkins also recommended that motorists use glass cleaner and wash the windows on the inside and outside.

Bumper cleaning should be left until the very end, the writer noted, as a lot of dirt can accumulate on this part of the vehicle.

Doing a thorough job on the interior is something drivers may want to consider, as research from Queen Mary University found that steering wheels contain nine times as many germs as a public toilet seat.

Posted by Anne Simpson
 


Hand washing ‘allows drivers to check their vehicles for bumps and nicks’

Monday, April 11th, 2011

As well as delivering a better finish, washing a car by hand is also a good way to inspect it for damage to the paint and other areas.

Jim Travers, writing for ConsumerReports.org, stated that with the weather improving many motorists will be giving their vehicles a spring clean.

By using car shampoo and car waxes themselves, motorists can ensure that their cars are given a thorough going over without fear of scratches which can occur from the abrasive bristles used at automatic washes.

In addition, doing the job by hand means a detailed inspection of the bodywork can be carried out.

"Hand washing in the driveway is an excellent opportunity to see if any nicks or dings from the ravages of winter need further attention – like a loose trim piece, or maybe a ding that warrants some touch-up paint," Mr Travers added.

According to an entry on the FindMyLocal.com.au blog, motors should be cleaned on a regular basis and drivers should not wait for them to be caked in mud before breaking out the wash mitts.

Posted by Simone Williams
 


Using correct tools ‘can keep a car looking new for years’

Friday, April 1st, 2011

By investing in the right car waxes, wash mitts and clay bars, drivers can keep their motor looking fresh and new for years to come.

That is according to Mike Pennington, director of training at Meguiar's, who stated that many people still use washing up liquid and tea towels on their vehicles believing that these will do a good enough job. Hot Rod reports.

However, nothing could be further from the truth, as the chemicals in the soap coupled with the rough nature of dish cloths mean that the paint is being subjected to a lot of abuse.

Instead, drivers need to invest in the "right products" the expert said.

"Unfortunately, many people still use dishwashing detergent and poor quality towelling to wash and dry their car, not realising that the detergent is so aggressive that it can actually begin to dry out the paint … while the rough and unfriendly towels cause minute scratches and swirls," Mr Pennington told the blog.

Ricochet's Rapid Detail made a similar point recently, stating that swirl marks are likely to be the result of poor washing technique.

Posted by Matt Casson
 


Van drivers ‘more likely to use car care products’

Friday, February 18th, 2011

Van drivers take more pride in their vehicles than those who drive cars, with new research showing that they clean and maintain more often than other motorists.

According to a survey by Swinton Insurance, 45 per cent of light commercial vehicle owners use car care products to clean their van, while just a quarter of car drivers do the same thing.

As well as using the right detailing tools, van drivers clean on a more regular basis, with 39 per cent saying that they do the work at least once a week.

In comparison, just 15 per cent of car owners do this.

Phil Moss, commercial vehicle manager at Swinton, said: "A lot of van drivers are self-employed so it is really good for business if adverts on their van are dirt free and are clearly seen."

The study found that van drivers are most likely to employ a sponge to get their motor looking good but there are more effective products than this.

Kevin Wellman, estimator at Dutch Miller Chevrolet Body Shop, told Irontontribune.com that sponges should be avoided as they can trap dirt and move it around the vehicle, ruining the finish.

Instead van drivers could opt for wash mitts, which are specially designed to be kind to paint jobs.

Posted by Matt Casson
 


No driver ‘should be without car wash and polish mitts’

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

When it comes to detailing a car and achieving the perfect finish using the correct products such as car shampoo, car wax and snow foam are essential but one item drivers must never find themselves without is a lamb's wool wash mitt.

That is according to Richard Tipper from detailing company Perfection Ltd, who told BOTB News that car wash and polish mitts are the best way of reducing the number of scratches on the bodywork.

He stated that the majority of scratches and marks which are found on vehicles come from improper washing and using the wrong tools.

When asked what one item is essential to achieving the best finish, Mr Tipper responded: "A 100 per cent lamb's wool wash mitt. 80 per cent of scratches on a car are from the washing process and the mitt will limit that."

He added that under no circumstances should a sponge be used in its place.

Kevin Wellman, estimator at Dutch Miller Chevrolet Body Shop, made a similar point to Irontontribune.com, stating that sponges do more harm than good in many instances.

Posted by Anne Simpson


Teens ‘can help’ with car exterior care

Monday, July 12th, 2010

Teens 'can help' with car exterior care

Most parents teach their children from a young age that doing chores is an important part of growing up.

The tasks allocated to youngsters should be age-appropriate, advised Priscilla Benfield, writing on Helium.

One job that could be fun for both young and older offspring could be washing the car, especially if they are allowed to finish the job with a mini water fight.

And to avoid car scratches by using the wrong equipment, a pure wool wash mitt may ensure kids do not accidentally ruin a car’s exterior, although car scratch remover could help get rid of any unsightly scrapes.

“Part of your teen’s chore list can include doing things like mowing the lawn, washing the car or other outside jobs that need to be done,” suggested Ms Benfield.

She added while not every family member may be enthused about washing car exteriors or helping around the home, they should be reminded that one day they will have their own space or vehicle and will realise the importance of looking after it.

Mums and dads may decide the sooner they get their kids to don a pure wool wash mitt to help clean the car, the better!

Posted by Matt Casson


Teens ‘can help’ with car exterior care

Monday, July 12th, 2010

Family washing carMost parents teach their children from a young age that doing chores is an important part of growing up.

The tasks allocated to youngsters should be age-appropriate, advised Priscilla Benfield, writing on Helium.

One job that could be fun for both young and older offspring could be washing the car, especially if they are allowed to finish the job with a mini water fight.

And to avoid car scratches by using the wrong equipment, a pure wool wash mitt may ensure kids do not accidentally ruin a car’s exterior, although car scratch remover could help get rid of any unsightly scrapes.

"Part of your teen’s chore list can include doing things like mowing the lawn, washing the car or other outside jobs that need to be done," suggested Ms Benfield.

She added while not every family member may be enthused about washing car exteriors or helping around the home, they should be reminded that one day they will have their own space or vehicle and will realise the importance of looking after it.

Mums and dads may decide the sooner they get their kids to don a pure wool wash mitt to help clean the car, the better!

Posted by Matt Casson