Archive for the ‘Microfibre cloths’ Category

Miliband might find windscreen cleaner useful for keeping vehicle clean

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

Windscreen cleaner and microfibre cloths might be worth purchasing for Labour leader Ed Miliband, as photographs have shown his vehicle being spruced up.

However, pictures in the Daily Mail showed that an unknown woman was tasked with keeping the Ford Focus in top condition outside the MP's north London home, perhaps while Mr Miliband was away at the Labour Conference in Liverpool.

The newspaper noted that the cleaner paid close attention to the car's headlamps and wing mirrors, perhaps hoping to ensure that visibility for those behind the wheel remains good as winter approaches.

When questioned about whether Mr Miliband had employed the lady as a cleaner, his spokesman said: "I'll ask him in the morning."

A recent survey by SimpleMotoring.co.uk indicated that 90.9 per cent of men feel they are able to complete basic car maintenance tasks such as checking tyre pressure and oil, while only 51.8 per cent of females said the same.  

Posted by James Robson


Microfibre cloths ‘can reduce chances of swirl marks’

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Poor washing and drying techniques can do more damage to a car's bodywork than any amount of stones and grit from the road.

Drivers who have noticed their vehicle is covered in swirl marks may be responsible for a large percentage of them, with the wrong tools and approach one of the most likely reasons for the tired-looking exterior.

There are steps that motorists can take to reduce the chances of this occurring, with microfibre cloths being one of the solutions.

The boys at Victory Detailing recently used them to dry off a Corvette to ensure the hard work they had put into washing it was not ruined.

"We dried the car down with fresh microfibre towels to prevent adding swirl marks to the car's paint," the team noted.

Detailing enthusiast Ryan Riegel made a similar point to Your News Now recently, stating that microfibre cloths can prevent small and large scratches by not trapping lint like other products do.

Posted by Mark Henderson
 


Writer suggests detailing tools for the Batmobile

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

The Batmobile is one of the most famous cars to ever grace the big screen and the vehicle of choice for nine-year-olds everywhere.

Practically indestructable and uber-cool, Batman's wheels tick all of the boxes.

Even after it has been involved in explosions, crashes and flips, the motor still looks in pristine condition.

If Batman were to ask Alfred to detail the car, what products would he suggest?

ChuckG, writing on the blog savings.com, has come up with a list of tools which the Dark Knight may employ to keep the Batmobile looking in tip-top shape.

One is Wurth Glass Cleaner, which the writer claims will allow Batman to see clearly as he rampages through the streets of Gotham City.

To keep the cabin in excellent condition, the superhero could use Meguiar's Quik Interior Detailer, which will lift dust, dirt and other contaminants off the surface without leaving any residue or film on them.

ChuckG also suggested that the Dark Knight could use microfibre cloths so as to avoid scratching the Batmobile's paint job.

Another product Batman may want to use to keep the Batmobile looking good is Meguiar's All Purpose Cleaner, which was recently praised by one team of experts.

The guys at Victory Detailing reviewed the product and stated that while they are normally sceptical about all-in-one solutions, this one worked a treat on an interior they were tackling.

"We had much success removing stains and revitalising carpets with the spray solution. A light mist goes a long way as the product is [when] agitated it acts as a shampoo and lifts the dirt to the surface of the carpet," the team stated.

Something else that Batman may want to add to Alfred's detailing kit is Autoglym Aqua Wax, which was recently given the thumbs up by MSN Cars writer Richard Aucock.

Posted by Matt Casson

 


Washing and drying a car ‘requires the two-bucket approach’

Friday, July 15th, 2011

Washing and drying a car are both essential steps in making it look appealing, however, many drivers actually do more harm than good when it comes to these two tasks.

That is according to Michael Stoops from Meguiar's, who told AOL Autos that swirl marks are a major problem for many motorists and that they are more often than not caused by poor washing and drying techniques rather than stones from the road.

To avoid this, drivers should follow the two-bucket method along with grit guards, which will ensure the contaminants they lift off with their car shampoo are not rubbed back into the paint work.

"The point is to get the dirt off the car, then get it off the microfibre wash mitt into your rinse bucket, not put it back in the soapy water. The baffle just keeps the dirt from swirling around at the bottom of the bucket up into your water," Mr Stoops told the news provider.

While two buckets are important, it is also vital that owners use the correct tools to wash and dry their vehicles.

Namely, they should avoid old tea towels and rags and use microfibre cloths and wash mitts to do the job.

"The biggest mistake people make is using a cotton towel or an old beach towel and an old beach towel tends to have old beach sand in it. They're not removing the dirt from the paint, all they're doing is grinding it around and into the paint," the expert went on to add.

Richard Hinson, former associate publisher and editorial director of AutoWeek, told the Detroit Free Press recently that both exterior and interior detailing are important.

He recommended tackling the cabin before moving onto the outside, as this will see drivers avoid traipsing more dirt into the carpets and giving themselves more work to do.

Posted by Simone Williams
 


Microfibre cloths ‘help diminish scratches’

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

Scratches and swirl marks can really take the gloss off a car's finish and to avoid them, drivers should invest in microfibre cloths.

That is according to detailing enthusiast Ryan Riegel, who told Your News Now that these items come into their own when the time comes to strip off car waxes and apply a new coat.

"Micro-fiber towels, they help to diminish scratches, help not trap lint dust, stuff like that when removing or taking off wax, which can cause deeper scratches," he stated.

The expert went on to discuss errors people make when applying car waxes, which include doing the job in direct sunlight.

"Applying wax in sunlight, it doesn't give as much of a gloss as most would like," Mr Riegel told the news provider.

Jim Dvorak, spokesman for Mother's, told SunSentinel.com recently that new cars need to be waxed just like older vehicles do, with many people wrongly assuming they do not.

Posted by James Robson
 


A detailing business ‘requires several essential tools’

Friday, June 17th, 2011

Those keen to start their own car detailing business will need business acumen and several products to make their venture a success.

In terms of the latter, people who entrust their vehicle to another expect it to come back as good as new and for that to happen, the detailer needs several weapons in his arsenal.

As many members of the public will expect a detailing business to offer services for both the inside and outside of the motor.

Kamis, writing on the kemPlink Auto Detailing blog, has listed several essential items to ensure the company gets off the ground, which include microfibre cloths, car brushes, wash mitts, wax applicator pads, car polishers and car sealant.

In addition, he recommended investing in spray bottles, tyre cleaners and all-purpose detailing solutions.

Ricochet's Rapid Detail recently stressed it is important to know the difference between washing and detailing, with the former simply cleaning with shampoo while the latter is a more intricate process.

Posted by Mark Henderson
 


Treat dad with car cleaning products this Father’s Day?

Monday, June 13th, 2011

For those whose husbands or dads like to spend a Sunday afternoon out on the drive polishing every nook and cranny on the can getting him something useful this Father's Day should not be too taxing a task.

There is a plethora of professional-grade car cleaning products that could put a huge smile on his face, with brands such as Autoglym, Poorboys and Chemical Guys offering a range of car waxes, car shampoo and other items.

According to Carolyn McTighe, writing for the QMI Agency, if dad likes looking after his vehicle then buying him a selection of washes, polishes and cloths is a great idea.

Among the items she recommends are microfibre cloths, wash and polish mitts, interior detailing solutions, shampoo and wax.

For those whose dads are used to polishing by hand, investing in a car polisher could be a good idea, as AsiaOne's Darren Chang said recently that they do a better job than the human hand.

Posted by Mark Henderson
 


Bringing a car’s shine back ‘does not require a full re-spray’

Friday, June 10th, 2011

The elements can take their toll on a car and make the paintwork look tired and faded, however, that does not mean the whole vehicle has to be re-sprayed.

With such top-quality car care products available, motorists can spend a few hours taking care of their pride and joy and breathing new life into it.

The guys at Victory Detailing were recently called out to treat a vehicle that had seen better days.

Swirl marks and oxidation were becoming apparent and the team decided the best way to tackle the problem was to invest in clay bars, microfibre cloths and car waxes and take it from there.

"We began with a wash and scrub of the entire vehicle. This removed the bulk of the dirt covering the surface. The clay bar finished bringing the paint back to a 'bare' state free of surface contamination. After drying the van down with microfibre, we applied a coat of carnauba wax," the experts noted.

Jaime Montoya, owner of JAMS Automotive, told KFOX14 recently that when it comes to maintaining vehicles, prevention is better than cure.

Posted by Matt Casson
 


Autoglym gives volcanic ash protection tips

Friday, May 27th, 2011

The volcanic ash cloud may have largely passed through UK air space but Autoglym has given a range of tips drivers can take to ensure their vehicle does not suffer any damage from particles that have already fallen.

Step one is to thoroughly soak the motor to lift off any loose debris before using a pH-neutral car shampoo to neutralise the acidity of the ash.

Motorists must ensure they keep the vehicle wet with clean water when washing, as this will keep the surface lubricated and reduce the chances of scratching.

Drivers should then rinse the car and dry with it microfibre cloths before applying car polishes and car waxes to finish the bodywork.

"This latest ash cloud contains larger particles, which could be even more damaging, so we're again warning motorists to be especially vigilant and take extra precautions when cleaning their cars," Autoglym chief executive officer Paul Caller stated.

Forecasters have said that the cloud will have cleared the UK in time for the Bank Holiday weekend.

Posted by James Robson
 


Microfibre cloths a good way to dry and polish?

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

After cleaning a vehicle with car shampoo and clay bars, the next step is to dry it ready for waxing.

It may seem like a simple task but drying must be done properly and with the right materials, otherwise drivers can end up doing more harm than good.

For example, owners should never, under any circumstances, uses an old rag or tea towel for the job, as these retain contaminants and drivers will run these across their bodywork and scratch their paint.

According to Victory Detailing, microfibre cloths are the way forward.

The team recently wiped down an S-Type Jaguar and were happy with the job they did.

"We dried the vehicle down using new and soft microfibre towels. The microfibre we use is super absorbent and does not leave any film behind. Using new and premium microfibre is always a treat," the company said.

Ricochet's Rapid Detail recently warned drivers that poor washing and drying techniques can leave swirl marks on the car.

Posted by Mark Henderson